Berry Good Scones

It’s not high tea and there are no royal weddings in sight, but today we’re serving up some scones.

Berry Scones

Making these Berry Scones was a bloody good time. Bloody brilliant if I do say so myself. (If you read this post with a British accent in your head, it will make it much more fun :)).

Scones are all about the butter. 1) You want to make sure you keep your butter as cold as possible. Use refrigerated butter and work quickly. 2)You want to make sure the butter is spread through the scone batter evenly. The best way to do this is to grate the butter with a cheese grater.

With your hands, mix the butter and cream into the flour mixture until just incorporated. The mixture should look grainy, like cornmeal. Do not over mix because you want your butter to stay cold.

Place the scone batter on a well-floured surface and knead just until the dough comes together. It will probably only take 8-10 kneads. While kneading, incorporate the flour on your surface as needed because you do not want the dough to be sticky.

Roll the dough into an 8 inch circle - don't worry, it doesn't need to be a perfect circle, as you can tell.

Next, fold the dough into thirds and then into thirds again forming a rectangular square. Place the dough on parchment paper and place in your freezer for at least 10 minutes.

After you have cooled the dough, roll it into an 8 to 10 inch square. The dough should be much easier to roll at this point.

Sprinkle your berries all over the dough. If you are using fresh berries, freeze them first. If you use unfrozen berries, the color of the berries will melt into the dough causing your scone to have a funky color.

Now you will roll your dough into a log. Then you want to flatten the dough with your hands to form a long rectangle.

Slice your log into 5 squares. Then slice each square at the diagonal.

Brush some melted butter on top of the scones and then sprinkle sugar on the tops.

The assembly of these scones is not a traditional way of making scones. However, the folding of the scone dough will result in a light and flaky scone. Remember, do not over mix or over knead the dough and work fast so you can keep the butter as cold as possible. Do these two things and you’ll have bloody good scones.

Bake at 400 degrees for about 20 minutes or until both the top and bottom of the scone is light golden brown. Cool for ten minutes, and then enjoy fellow chaps!

Next on the list, Fish n’ Chips.

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16 responses »

  1. These scones look berry delicious. Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Reply
  2. These look bloody good! 😉

    Reply
  3. Ha ha, I naturally read the the post in my British accent and bloody good it was too 🙂 I always always get a bit confused about US scones! But whatever these do look good!

    Reply
  4. great job gal!

    Reply
  5. These look uber delicious. Well done.

    Reply
  6. I love the addition of berries right into the scones. The finished product looks great for high tea, or a midnight snack!

    Reply
  7. These look great! I’ve been trying to find a yummy berry scone recipe and I think this might be it! One of my favorites to get at a local bakery is a berry one with cream cheese-makes it extra moist and yummy! Might have to try working that into this!

    Reply
  8. I’ve been looking for a good scone recipe for the last few weeks and I think I’ve just found it. Again, you’ve done some great photography along with some very tasty looking scones

    Reply
  9. Timothy from Montana

    I made them earlier multiplying the entire recipe by one-and-a-half using whole wheat flour as well as four TBSP of honey and two of molasses instead of sugar. Some stuck together on the pan, so I had to bake most of them for another 3-5 minutes. I may not have rolled them tight enough as they did not maintain structural integrity very well. Good taste but they are leaning over, some in different directions, also, some of the berries are falling out. All feedback is appreciated.

    Reply
    • Pastries tend to be very delicate so it’s important that you use the right kind of whole wheat flour. I would recommend using whole wheat pastry flour. I don’t think it was that you didn’t roll them tightly enough, I think it was the flour itself that made it difficult to maintain the structural integrity. Some of my berries fell out as well, but I just patted them back in. Another note, refridgerating the dough whenever it becomes difficult to work with really helps a great deal. It makes the dough much easier to work with and will hold the berries in better.

      Reply
    • Pastries tend to be very delicate so it’s important that you use the right kind of whole wheat flour. I would recommend using whole wheat pastry flour. I don’t think it was that you didn’t roll them tightly enough, I think it was the flour itself that made it difficult to maintain the structural integrity. Some of my berries fell out as well, but I just patted them back in. Another note, refridgerating the dough whenever it becomes difficult to work with really helps a great deal. It makes the dough much easier to work with and will hold the berries in better. Hope this helps some!

      Reply

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